Greg Shobe stands for a portrait in one of the many soybean fields he plants and harvests every year. “I saw a deed that the farm was deeded to a George Campbell in 1845, it went from George, to Jeremiah right on down the line to my wife's grandparents. But for 150 years some of the land has been in the family.” 
Greg says that the affect that the current tarrifs will have on some farmer in 2019 is that income is going to drop to levels that are going to be non profitable.
 Erick Werling and Greg Shobe work around Shobes farm before starting a day of harvesting soybeans.
 Greg Shobe readies a drill in his barn in Waynesfield, Ohio during some morning work fixing leaks on his grain-bins.
 Greg Shobe climbs up the ladder of a grain-bin on his farm in Waynesfield, Ohio to fix a leak in the bin. Soybean prices fell more than 12% (lows not seen since 2008) since China placed a 25% import tax on the legume to retaliate against the Trump administration. According to Purdue University/CME Group report, 70 percent of farmers are expecting a decline in income of ten percent or more next year. The Shobe farm is expecting to lose between $100,000.00 $150,000.00 of their income due to the U.S. Trade War with China.
 “Its a mess, but I keep track of it all” Said Greg, while gathering tools in one of his barns to fix a leak in one of many grain-bins.
 Greg Shobe climbs out of a grain-bin after preppng it to store grain. “eventually you have to liquidate some capital to come up with enough money to pay your expenses.” Greg said when asked what his concerns were being a farmer and facing tarrifs in 2019. “We have a fair amount of land debt from land that we purchased in the past three years and we needed the current 2017 level prices for grain to basically continue to operate to pay for the high price land that we purchased in 2014 and 2016”
 Erick Werling, Greg Shobe, and Tami Shobe Greg’s wife, look at a video on Tami’s phone during a lunch break on the Shobe farm.
 “In 2019 the net farm income is going to drop to levels that are going to be non profitable, and therefore farmers are going to start getting behind on land payments and machinery payments the current price of soybeans today are below production cost.” Soybean prices fell more than 12% (lows not seen since 2008) Since China placed a 25% import tax on the legume to retaliate against the Trump Administration. “How that affects a farm is he no longer has enough income to pay his fixed expenses and his long term debt. So he run shorts of revenue and ends back at his banker asking for money to pay bills.”
 Greg Shobe drives a tractor during harvesting of Soybeans in Waynesfield, Ohio some of the land the Shobes farm has been in the family for 150 years.
 Greg Shobe speaks with his son Preston Shobe during soybean harvest, some of the land being farmed by the Shobe’s have been in the family for 150 years.
 Soybean prices fell more than 12% (lows not seen since 2008) Since China placed a 25% import tax on the legume to retaliate against the Trump Administration. “Soybean prices fell over $2.00 a bushel when the tariffs went into effect therefore its going to affect net income by $2.00 a bushel that we produce which is around 55,000 bushels per year.”
 Erick Werling one of Greg Shobes farmhands drives the combine harvester during soybean harvest in Waynesfield,Ohio soybean prices fell more than 12% (lows not seen since 2008) Since China placed a 25% import tax on the legume to retaliate against the Trump Administration.
 Greg Shobe at his farm in Waynesfield, Ohio. Some of the land the Shobes farm has been in the family for 150 years.
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